02-Planeta_manchette_175x100
Allegrini 2018

MONTALCINO, CHIANTI, UMBRIA, FRANCIACORTA AND VALPOLICELLA – THESE TERRITORIES HAVE THE HIGHEST PROPERTY VALUES, REVEALED A STUDY ON THE SPECIALIZED PORTAL IDEALISTA.IT TOGETHER WITH WINENEWS

It is no news that landscapes and territories affect the value of real estate. It is also known that the prestige of wine together with the value of its vineyards, at least in the most prestigious areas, seems to have a direct effect, as the study on the portal specializing in real estate www.idealista.it, in collaboration with WineNews, ranked Italian properties with vineyards. It shows that properties in Tuscany and Umbria are the most famous and also the most expensive. The price of properties in Siena (Chianti and Montalcino) average 3 thousand 154 euros per square meter, but this figure varies greatly depending on the type of building (castle, manor, farmhouse).
The size, in square meters, starts from a minimum of 300 square meters. This is constant for all agricultural wine making properties in Italy, whose market values rarely fall below one million Euros. The Chianti hills of Florence follow at an average 2.755 euros per square meter, then the hills of Umbria (2.024 euros) and Chianti Aretino (1.803). In Lombardy, Franciacorta (1.609), the Venetian area of Valpolicella (1.508), Mount Etna, with an average of 1.404 Euros, and the Langhe with 1.381 Euros per square meter.
According to Vincenzo De Tommaso, head of research at Idealista.it, “after the wave of foreign investors, Italians are protagonists again. Properties are being bought more and more by Italian wine entrepreneurs, though there are exceptions. We should keep in mind that the success of this return to the land is partially due to wineries, partially to maintaining the value of the investment over time, as well as integrating tourism (agri-tourism) which generate additional income”.

Copyright © 2000/2018


Contatti: info@winenews.it
Seguici anche su Twitter: @WineNewsIt
Seguici anche su Facebook: @winenewsit


Questo articolo è tratto dall'archivio di WineNews - Tutti i diritti riservati - Copyright © 2000/2018

Altri articoli