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Allegrini 2018

THE RICHER YOU ARE THE MORE YOU DRINK. IN THE UK AND THE USA, THE BRITISH NATIONAL OFFICE OF STATISTICS AND GALLUP REVEAL ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION IS LINKED TO INCOME LEVEL AND HIGHER EARNERS DRINK MORE WINE THAN BEER

Those who earn more, drink more, summarizes the results of the British National Office of Statistics study that revealed almost one in five people who earn more than 40.000 pounds a year drink at least five days a week.
The percentage falls to 8% for those instead who earn less than 10.000 pounds a year. The percentage is similar also in the United States. Habitual drinkers with a household income over 75.000 dollars are 78%, which falls to 47% for those whose income is less than 30.000 dollars, revealed "MarketWatch" (www.marketwatch.com), citing the latest Gallup poll (www.gallup.com).
The study seems to confirm that those who earn more tend to drink more regularly, at least in the UK, since the most regular drinkers are those between 25 and 64, while most binge drinkers; i.e. casual drinkers, are between 16 and 24. Further, of the well to do that drink during the week, regardless of frequency, 77% are men, while 66% of regular drinkers in the low-income group are women.
In the US, however, regardless of income level, 69% men against 59% of women drink regularly.
Another important fact is that Britain has become a nation of wine lovers. 50% of Brits drink wine once a week, compared to 40% of those who drink beer. The most regular drinkers live in Scotland and Wales, while most of the abstainers reside in London.
In the USA, however, the higher earners’ preference for wine is minimal (38% vs. 36%), while beer abundantly exceeds wine in the 30.000-75.000 dollars income bracket (44%). Wine is the favorite alcoholic beverage among those who have a diploma or a degree.

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